Exclusive
Visual Studio

Introduction to Programming With Microsoft Visual Basic 6 (VB)
(Microsoft Training Course: 1587) - 5 days - £2640 exc VAT



> Target Audience
THIS COURSE HAS NOW RETIRED. PLEASE SEE THE SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION FOR DETAILS OF ALTERNATIVE COURSES.
This course provides an introduction to programming for students with little or no prior programming experience. Through this course, students will gain a strong, accessible, hands-on foundation in the language skills needed to develop Microsoft Visual Basic business applications.
NOTE: THIS COURSE IS NOT NORMALLY SCHEDULED AS COURSE 'Mastering Visual Basic Fundamentals (1303)' COVERS SIMILAR MATERIAL AND ENABLES STUDENTS TO PROGRESS TO THE OTHER TWO MORE ADVANCED VB 6 COURSES - 1013 AND 1016
> Course outline
  1. Overview
  2. Application Development
  3. Designing Program Logic
  4. Programming Syntax
  5. Procedures and Modules
  6. Data Storage
  7. Advanced Data Storage
  8. Operators
  9. Decision-Making Constructs
  10. Looping Constructs
  11. Adding a User Interface to an Application
  12. COM Programming
  13. Windows NT Services
  14. Performance Measurement Tools for Win32-based Applications

Supplementary InformationThis course has now retired and is no longer available. We suggest you look at Course [[{http://www.F1Comp.Co.UK/computer_training/Microsoft_Training_Courses/Visual-Studio-2005/4994.aspx}4994: Introduction to Programming Microsoft .NET Framework Applications with Microsoft Visual Studio 2005]].
Module 1: Overview
  • Software Applications
  • Components of an Application
Skills
  • Define the term “software application.”
  • Briefly describe the purpose of some common computer applications, such as device drivers, data-analysis applications, games, office productivity tools, utilities, and multimedia applications.
  • List the components of an application and explain the function of user interface, code, data, and algorithms
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Module 2: Application Development
  • Approaches to Application Development
  • The Development Process
  • Defining the Problem
  • Designing the Application
  • Writing the Solution Code
  • Refining the Design
Skills
  • Briefly describe some approaches to application development, including chaotic, structured, modular, and object-based approaches.
  • Explain the process of software development.
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Module 3: Designing Program Logic
  • Program Logic Design Tools
  • Designing Program Logic
  • Modularizing Functionality
  • Program Flow
  • Lab: Creating a Windows application
Skills
  • Briefly describe some of the tools used to design program logic.
  • Use flowcharting to design a solution to a problem.
  • Design a simple input/output algorithm.
  • Design a simple decision-making algorithm.
  • Design a simple looping algorithm.
  • Briefly describe the advantages of modularizing functionality.
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Module 4: Programming Syntax
  • Keywords and Constants
  • Operators
  • Intrinsic Statements and Functions
  • Documenting Your Code
  • Using the Immediate Window
  • Lab: Hello World
Skills
  • Identify Visual Basic keywords and constants, and describe their usage.
  • Use operators to perform mathematical operations, value comparisons, string concatenations, and logical operations.
  • Use Visual Basic intrinsic statements and functions to perform actions.
  • Display messages to your users with a dialog box by using the MsgBox statement.
  • Identify and correct syntax errors in code.
  • Find Help files while programming by using context-sensitive Help.
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Module 5: Procedures and Modules
  • Procedures
  • Modules
Skills
  • Differentiate between a subroutine and a function.
  • Differentiate between a general subroutine and an event subroutine.
  • Define and create a module.
  • Create a subroutine.
  • Call a subroutine from the Immediate window.
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Module 6: Data Storage
  • Types of Storage
  • Variables
  • Data Types
  • Objects
  • Using Variables
  • Constants
  • Lab: Accepting and Displaying Data
Skills
  • Differentiate between temporary and permanent storage.
  • List types of permanent storage.
  • Define a variable.
  • Identify different data types.
  • Define an object.
  • Declare a constant.
  • Populate a variable by using an InputBox function.
  • Define NULL.
  • Differentiate between implicit and explicit variable declarations.
  • Assign values to variables.
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Module 7: Advanced Data Storage
  • Arrays
  • Scope and Lifetime
  • Parameters and Return Values
  • Data Type Validation
  • Practice: Identifying Data Types and Scope
Skills
  • Define an array, and use integer and string arrays to store data.
  • Define a variable scope and differentiate between local and global variables.
  • Identify return values and parameters of functions and procedures.
  • Perform data type validation.
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Module 8: Operators
  • Comparison Operators
  • Logical Operators
  • Mathematical Operators
  • Precedence
  • Lab: Finding the Average Rainfall
Skills
  • Identify and explain the different types of comparison operators.
  • Identify and explain the different types of logical operators.
  • Identify and explain the different types of mathematical operators.
  • Identify precedence of comparison and mathematical operators.
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Module 9: Decision-Making Constructs
  • If...Then Constructs
  • Select Case Constructs
  • Using Decision-Making Constructs for Data Validation
  • Logical Errors
  • Lab: Determining the Minimum and Maximum of a Set of Input Numbers
Skills
  • Identify the appropriate use of IF constructs and SELECT constructs.
  • Use the AND and OR logical operators with decision-making constructs.
  • Validate user input by using range, length, empty, and NULL checks.
  • Identify logic errors in decision-making constructs.
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Module 10: Looping Constructs
  • The DO Construct
  • The FOR Construct
  • Exiting a Loop
  • Logical Errors
  • Lab: Accepting and Displaying Strings from an Array
Skills
  • Identify the appropriate use of DO constructs and FOR constructs.
  • Use EXIT to exit a loop.
  • Identify logic errors in looping constructs.
  • Stop program execution by pressing CTRL+BREAK.
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Module 11: Adding a User Interface to an Application
  • Forms
  • Controls
  • Control Properties
  • Event-Driven Programming
  • Coding Event Procedures
  • Lab: Creating the Rainfall User Interface
Skills
  • State the purpose of a form and the purpose of the Form_Load and Form_Unload events.
  • Identify simple Visual Basic controls, such as the Command Button, Label, and Text Box controls.
  • Set control properties in a program.
  • Define an event.
  • Write an event procedure.
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Module 12: COM Programming
  • COM architecture
  • Creating a COM object
  • Creating a COM object server
  • Advanced COM topics
  • Lab: Creating a COM object
Skills
  • Describe the architecture of COM.
  • Explain COM interfaces.
  • Explain how COM works.
  • Build a COM object.
  • Explain how Automation works.
  • Describe the role of ActiveX Template Library.
  • Explain the architecture of distributed COM (DCOM).
  • Describe COM+.
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Module 13: Windows NT Services
  • Introduction to Windows NT service architecture
  • Programming a Win32 service
  • Developing a service control program
  • Lab: Creating a Windows NT service
Skills
  • Explain the Windows NT services architecture.
  • Explain how to create a service application.
  • Compare and contrast a UNIX daemon to a Windows NT service.
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Module 14: Performance Measurement Tools for Win32-based Applications
  • Process Viewer (PView)
  • Performance Monitor
  • Profiler
  • Visual Studio Analyzer
  • Lab: Performance-tuning a Win32 application
Skills
  • Use PView to monitor running processes and see processor priority and usage, thread processor usage, and virtual-memory consumption.
  • Use the Performance Monitor to detect and display dynamic system resource utilization.
  • Use the Profiler to report on function coverage and timing and line coverage.
  • Use the Visual Studio Analyzer to identify performance bottlenecks within a Windows NT application and graphically represent the application flow.
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> Pre-Requisites
Before attending this course, students must have the following pre-requisites:
  • Ability to use a computer keyboard and a mouse.
  • Familiarity with the general operations of Microsoft Windows 98 and Microsoft Windows NT Workstation desktop applications, such as open, save, copy, move, and delete files
> Purpose
This course introduces students to the techniques used in the key areas of computer programming. At the end of the course, students will have written a simple database application that demonstrates their ability to write computer programs
> Supplementary Information
This course has now retired and is no longer available. We suggest you look at Course [[{http://www.F1Comp.Co.UK/computer_training/Microsoft_Training_Courses/Visual-Studio-2005/4994.aspx}4994: Introduction to Programming Microsoft .NET Framework Applications with Microsoft Visual Studio 2005]].